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Another Wave of Restaurant Closures Hits the Twin Cities

30 year-old Purple Onion in Dinkytown is just one more restaurant that won’t reopen

The black awning with white writing at The Purple Onion hangs over a beige sidewalk and large, blank glass windows
Dinkytown’s student study spot has closed
The Purple Onion/Facebook

The Purple Onion has served generations of University of Minnesota students over its thirty years in business, but the restaurant couldn’t survive the pandemic. The Dinkytown eatery was a popular spot for hanging out with casual food and handy location. Students would drop in and post up for hours to study and caffeinate. In a parting message the restaurant said, “It is with great sadness that we announce our permanent closure. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to serve the U of M Campus for 30 amazing years. The memories made inside these walls will live on forever.”

Sushi Tango in Uptown inside the mall that was called Calhoun Square has closed after 18 years. The restaurant opened to immediate popularity with Japanese fare, drinks, and plenty of sushi rolls. The mall, recently renamed Seven Points, has seen an exodus of eateries in recent years with Fig + Farro, Famous Dave’s, and Libertine all closing. Sushi Tango still operates one location in Woodbury.

Last chance for Surly Taproom and Honey & Rye Bakehouse at Graze. The bakery outpost will shutter after October 31. The beheamouth taproom will close November 2. Honey & Rye’s original location continues to serve all the treats in St. Louis Park.

Sonder Shaker in Northeast has hit pause for the time being with hopes to return one day. “Sonder has experienced financial losses so far in 2020, now with the threat of COVID-19 spiking again we are certain that losses will continue over the next several months. The combined hurdles of reduced capacity, the Minneapolis ban on bar seating & service, and the lack of consumer confidence are just too difficult to overcome.” The restaurant will work to sell cocktail kits at a local liquor store and return when the restaurant landscape has shifted once again.

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