clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Four gulab jamun sweets sit in syrup in a silver goblet with a spoon on a wooden table.
Gulab jamun from India Palace Uptown.
India Palace Uptown

14 Flavorful Indian and South Asian Restaurants Around the Twin Cities Metro

Crispy butter dosas, rich lamb makhani, and sweet syrupy gulab jamun

View as Map
Gulab jamun from India Palace Uptown.
| India Palace Uptown

The Twin Cities’ Indian restaurants are much more abundant and diverse than a quick glance at Minneapolis and St. Paul might reveal — many of the best spots are out in the suburbs, from Bloomington to Arden Hills to Maplewood. From rich lamb vindaloo to paper-thin dosas and savory sambar, these are some of the best options in a scene that grows more robust by the day, as new restaurants, particularly those serving South Indian cuisine, pop up around the edges of the metro. In this map, we also included a few restaurants that lean toward Nepalese cuisine (tracking down the Cities’ best momos is crucial intel) as well as a few spots that serve street food. Here are 13 fantastic Indian restaurants near Minneapolis and St. Paul.

Read More

Kumar's Minneapolis

Copy Link

Kumar’s, just off Highway 23 in Apple Valley, specializes in Tamil cuisine. Vegan and vegetarian options are plentiful. On the weekends, opt for the banana leaf meals, which include an array of foods and accompaniments in small, round dishes — from dal to Chennai chili chicken to yogurt and dessert — arranged on a broad green banana leaf, served with chapati and crunchy appalam (a.k.a. papadam).

Godavari Indian Restaurant

Copy Link

Godavari is a South Indian franchise that opened its first Minnesota location in Eden Prairie’s mall. There’s chole bhature and biryani on the menu, but the real stars are the South Indian dishes: spongy idly served with chutneys, crispy Bengaluru butter dosas, vada (deep-fried lentil doughnuts) dunked in sambar. Save room for sweet halwa and rasmalai.

Kabob's Indian Grill

Copy Link

Come to Kabob’s for the lunch thali, a sumptuous sampling of dishes, served daily from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (think onion and chicken pakora, Andrha chicken curry, cabbage kootu, and more). Both vegetarian and non-vegetarian options are available. Beyond the Thali, Kabob’s has an extensive menu spanning everything from tandoor to rich curries to South Indian specialties, like masala dosas. Carrot and wheat halwas, basundi, and syrupy gulab jamun are on the dessert menu.

India Palace Uptown

Copy Link

India Palace is a three-decade institution of Indian cuisine in the Twin Cities. In addition to the Uptown location, it has suburban outposts in Woodbury, Burnsville, and Roseville. The menu is built on family recipes passed between generations, and leans toward North Indian dishes like shahi chicken korma, lamb makhani, and rogan dosh, a Kashmiri dish of pan-roasted lamb in yogurt sauce. Indian Palace also serves an excellent lunch buffet. For dessert, try the kheer or homemade mango ice cream.

Namaste Cafe

Copy Link

Namaste Café leans more to the Nepali border than the Indian one — this former Victorian home-turned cozy restaurant in Uptown is an excellent stop for curries, chaats, and cocktails. The whole menu here is organic: Start with light and crispy bhel puri or little flavor parcels of golgappa (a.k.a. pani puri, a.k.a puchka). The aloo bodi or Punjabi spinach paneer make for hearty vegetarian entrees. If you aren’t in any hurry, take a seat on Namaste’s patio, and enjoy a homemade chai.

Hot Indian

Copy Link

Hot Indian recently closed its Midtown Global Market, but it still operates a stand at Target Field (not to mention the State Fair). This spot is a go-to for rice bowls and Indian street food, from samosas to kati rolls (the paneer tikka is an excellent, filling option for vegetarians). Don’t miss the Indi Fries, a mix of russet and sweet potatoes breaded with rice and chickpea flour, served with a pickled aioli sauce.

Gorkha Palace

Copy Link

Gorkha Palace, named for an ancient palace perched on a mountaintop in Nepal, is an organic restaurant that serves meals made with locally sourced ingredients and humanely raised meats. Must-tries include appetizers like the veggie pakora — crispy cabbage, onion, and jalapenos fritters are dipped in chickpea batter and fried — and the savory momos, perhaps the restaurant’s standout dish. Gorkha Palace grinds its own spices and makes its own ghee in-house.

Spice & Tonic - Indian Cuisine & Bar

Copy Link

Spice & Tonic, a newcomer to the Indian cuisine scene, specializes in North Indian cuisine. Start with samosas or chicken pakora as an appetizer, order a sumptuous Peshawari naan (stuffed with a mash of sun-dried coconut, cashews, raisins, and cardamom) on the side, and finish with the matar paneer or chicken Makhani — or one of the restaurant’s seafood specialties, like fish vindaloo or shrimp curry.

Himalayan Restaurant

Copy Link

Himalayan Restaurant on Lake Street delves into India, Nepalese, and Tibetan cuisine, and does it all exceptionally well. The creamy chicken tikka masala is excellent here, as are the kothe — steamed momos that are pan-fried and served with a savory tomato-cilantro chutney. On the side, savor the dense, flakey layers of a fresh-made aloo paratha, or extra buttery naan, and save room for desserts like kheer and mango pudding.

Namaste India Grill & Brewhouse

Copy Link

Namaste India serves a vast menu of Indian dishes (think everything from spicy mango lamb curry to richly aromatic beef biryani), but specializes in street food. The golgappa (also known as pani puri, puchka, and other names, in various regions of India) are crunchy semolina shells filled with a densely flavorful mix of chickpeas, potatoes, and spiced water. The spicy chole bhature, served with deep-fried bread, is another great bet.

Everest on Grand

Copy Link

Everest on Grand specializes in Nepali, Tibetan, and North Indian dishes — the momos come in chicken, vegetarian, and yak meat varieties. The restaurant serves classic meat dishes like lamb curry and chicken vindaloo, but is known for its extensive vegetarian menu: The katahar, made with young green jackfruit buds, is one of its specialities. Everest on Grand also serves thukpa, a Nepali and Tibetan noodle soup that’s excellent comfort food during chilly weather.

India House

Copy Link

A Grand Avenue staple in St. Paul, India House serves an extensive menu of North Indian dishes. Try the beef shahi korma, served in a creamy sauce and garnished with cashews, and raisins, or the baingan bharta — charcoal-baked eggplant served with fresh tomatoes, onions, and peas. India House also serves tender scallop saag, scallop masala, and scallop Kashmiri, in a unique take on some classic preparations.

Indian Masala

Copy Link

Indian Masala serves one of the metro’s most popular Indian buffets: Load up on chili paneer, hearty dal, chana masala, and aloo gobi, and entrees from Mughlai chicken to goat vindaloo. The restaurant also serves a number of South Indian specialities — from sambar vada to paneer, chicken, and mutton dosas — and serves and entirely vegan buffet on Wednesdays and Thursdays. The ice cream here is homemade.

Loading comments...

Kumar's Minneapolis

Kumar’s, just off Highway 23 in Apple Valley, specializes in Tamil cuisine. Vegan and vegetarian options are plentiful. On the weekends, opt for the banana leaf meals, which include an array of foods and accompaniments in small, round dishes — from dal to Chennai chili chicken to yogurt and dessert — arranged on a broad green banana leaf, served with chapati and crunchy appalam (a.k.a. papadam).

Godavari Indian Restaurant

Godavari is a South Indian franchise that opened its first Minnesota location in Eden Prairie’s mall. There’s chole bhature and biryani on the menu, but the real stars are the South Indian dishes: spongy idly served with chutneys, crispy Bengaluru butter dosas, vada (deep-fried lentil doughnuts) dunked in sambar. Save room for sweet halwa and rasmalai.

Kabob's Indian Grill

Come to Kabob’s for the lunch thali, a sumptuous sampling of dishes, served daily from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (think onion and chicken pakora, Andrha chicken curry, cabbage kootu, and more). Both vegetarian and non-vegetarian options are available. Beyond the Thali, Kabob’s has an extensive menu spanning everything from tandoor to rich curries to South Indian specialties, like masala dosas. Carrot and wheat halwas, basundi, and syrupy gulab jamun are on the dessert menu.

India Palace Uptown

India Palace is a three-decade institution of Indian cuisine in the Twin Cities. In addition to the Uptown location, it has suburban outposts in Woodbury, Burnsville, and Roseville. The menu is built on family recipes passed between generations, and leans toward North Indian dishes like shahi chicken korma, lamb makhani, and rogan dosh, a Kashmiri dish of pan-roasted lamb in yogurt sauce. Indian Palace also serves an excellent lunch buffet. For dessert, try the kheer or homemade mango ice cream.

Namaste Cafe

Namaste Café leans more to the Nepali border than the Indian one — this former Victorian home-turned cozy restaurant in Uptown is an excellent stop for curries, chaats, and cocktails. The whole menu here is organic: Start with light and crispy bhel puri or little flavor parcels of golgappa (a.k.a. pani puri, a.k.a puchka). The aloo bodi or Punjabi spinach paneer make for hearty vegetarian entrees. If you aren’t in any hurry, take a seat on Namaste’s patio, and enjoy a homemade chai.

Hot Indian

Hot Indian recently closed its Midtown Global Market, but it still operates a stand at Target Field (not to mention the State Fair). This spot is a go-to for rice bowls and Indian street food, from samosas to kati rolls (the paneer tikka is an excellent, filling option for vegetarians). Don’t miss the Indi Fries, a mix of russet and sweet potatoes breaded with rice and chickpea flour, served with a pickled aioli sauce.

Gorkha Palace

Gorkha Palace, named for an ancient palace perched on a mountaintop in Nepal, is an organic restaurant that serves meals made with locally sourced ingredients and humanely raised meats. Must-tries include appetizers like the veggie pakora — crispy cabbage, onion, and jalapenos fritters are dipped in chickpea batter and fried — and the savory momos, perhaps the restaurant’s standout dish. Gorkha Palace grinds its own spices and makes its own ghee in-house.

Spice & Tonic - Indian Cuisine & Bar

Spice & Tonic, a newcomer to the Indian cuisine scene, specializes in North Indian cuisine. Start with samosas or chicken pakora as an appetizer, order a sumptuous Peshawari naan (stuffed with a mash of sun-dried coconut, cashews, raisins, and cardamom) on the side, and finish with the matar paneer or chicken Makhani — or one of the restaurant’s seafood specialties, like fish vindaloo or shrimp curry.

Himalayan Restaurant

Himalayan Restaurant on Lake Street delves into India, Nepalese, and Tibetan cuisine, and does it all exceptionally well. The creamy chicken tikka masala is excellent here, as are the kothe — steamed momos that are pan-fried and served with a savory tomato-cilantro chutney. On the side, savor the dense, flakey layers of a fresh-made aloo paratha, or extra buttery naan, and save room for desserts like kheer and mango pudding.

Namaste India Grill & Brewhouse

Namaste India serves a vast menu of Indian dishes (think everything from spicy mango lamb curry to richly aromatic beef biryani), but specializes in street food. The golgappa (also known as pani puri, puchka, and other names, in various regions of India) are crunchy semolina shells filled with a densely flavorful mix of chickpeas, potatoes, and spiced water. The spicy chole bhature, served with deep-fried bread, is another great bet.

Everest on Grand

Everest on Grand specializes in Nepali, Tibetan, and North Indian dishes — the momos come in chicken, vegetarian, and yak meat varieties. The restaurant serves classic meat dishes like lamb curry and chicken vindaloo, but is known for its extensive vegetarian menu: The katahar, made with young green jackfruit buds, is one of its specialities. Everest on Grand also serves thukpa, a Nepali and Tibetan noodle soup that’s excellent comfort food during chilly weather.

India House

A Grand Avenue staple in St. Paul, India House serves an extensive menu of North Indian dishes. Try the beef shahi korma, served in a creamy sauce and garnished with cashews, and raisins, or the baingan bharta — charcoal-baked eggplant served with fresh tomatoes, onions, and peas. India House also serves tender scallop saag, scallop masala, and scallop Kashmiri, in a unique take on some classic preparations.

Indian Masala

Indian Masala serves one of the metro’s most popular Indian buffets: Load up on chili paneer, hearty dal, chana masala, and aloo gobi, and entrees from Mughlai chicken to goat vindaloo. The restaurant also serves a number of South Indian specialities — from sambar vada to paneer, chicken, and mutton dosas — and serves and entirely vegan buffet on Wednesdays and Thursdays. The ice cream here is homemade.

Related Maps