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A row of roast ducks hanging in a kitchen, with a man in a white shirt, black hat, and apron standing behind them, looking at them.
Roast duck at Mandarin Kitchen.
Mandarin Kitchen

13 Outstanding Chinese Restaurants Around the Twin Cities

Hand-pulled dan dan noodles, dim sum, and everything in between

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Roast duck at Mandarin Kitchen.
| Mandarin Kitchen

There are plenty of excellent Chinese restaurants around the Twin Cities, from dim sum institutions like Mandarin Kitchen and Yangtze Restaurant to beloved Cantonese staples like Shuang Cheng. For hand-pulled noodles, Sichuan fare shimmering with chili oil, or Anhui-style braised whole walleye, look no further than these Chinese restaurants around Minneapolis and St. Paul.

Note that these restaurants are listed geographically.

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Grand Szechuan Restaurant

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Chef Luo Guanghe’s dishes, shimmering with chili oil and studded with peppercorns, hit all the hot, sour, mouth-numbing notes of classic Sichuan cuisine. Try the beef and tofu in peppercorn broth, or the spicy lotus roots as an appetizer.

Mandarin Kitchen

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Head to Mandarin Kitchen for a dim sum brunch of pan-fried turnip cakes, pillowy steamed chicken buns, egg custards, and steamed pork dumplings. (Mandarin Kitchen has a vast menu of entrees, too, and hot pot.) At peak meal times, small parties can expect share tables — an arrangement that only adds to the bustling, convivial atmosphere. On weekends, this spot is packed with families, and the line often wraps out the door.

A person using chopsticks to grab one of three pan-fried chive dumplings on a plate.
Pan-fried chive dumplings from Mandarin Kitchen.
Mandarin Kitchen

Rainbow Chinese Restaurant and Bar

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Situated on Eat Street’s main drag, chef Tammy Wong’s Rainbow Chinese has been churning out excellent “Chinese Minnesotan” fare since the late 1980s — and after a pandemic hiatus, the dining room has finally reopened. Wander down Nicollet Avenue for plates of sauteed green beans and ma po tofu, simmered with Sichuan peppercorns.

Yangtze Restaurant

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Though Yangtze has a full menu, it’s best-known for its weekend dim sum, served every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Spare ribs arrive in a rich black bean sauce; golden-seared shrimp and chive dumplings are packed with sharp allium flavor. Round out the meal with sweet bites of egg custard pie.

Rice rolls in soy sauce on a white plate with a red patterned border.
Yangtze is one the metro’s best dim sum spots.
Yangtze Restaurant

Shuang Cheng

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This 31-year Dinkytown staple is known for its top-notch Cantonese menu. It specializes in seafood dishes, like crab with ginger and scallions and baked lobster in a five-spice salt. (For holidays and celebrations, the Peking-style roast duck is a great choice.) Shuang Cheng has great hot pot, too.

Lao Sze Chuan

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Also near the University of Minnesota campus, Lao Sze Chuan is a great place to share chilled, tangy Szechuan noodles; tea-smoked duck; and steaming beef soup, infused with spicy chili oil. Lao Sze Chuan’s appetizer list is notable, too — order some green bean jelly and spicy and sour squid for the table.

Hong Kong Noodle

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A Dinkytown favorite for Cantonese cuisine, Hong Kong Noodle is a great stop for a bowl of warming barbecue pork noodle soup, a salt-and-pepper squid appetizer, or a dim sum brunch of steamed buns and dumplings.

Legendary Spice

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Legendary Spice — formerly of the Lao Sze Chuan restaurant group, now linked to a Chengdu, China-based restaurant — focuses on classic Sichuan cuisine. The vast menu spans seafood, pork, beef, chicken, and vegetarian dishes, but the highlights are among the Sichuan cold appetizers (preserved duck egg with chili pepper, sliced beef and maw, etc.) and the Chengdu local favorites (spicy mao cai, tea-smoked duck, Sichuan crawfish, etc.).

A person adding scallions to a plate of dumplings topped with chili oil.
Legendary Spice in St. Paul.
Legendary Spice

Tea House Chinese Restaurant

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After more than a decade on University Avenue, Tea House remains a staple for excellent Chinese fare — Szechuan in particular. It’s a great place to dine family-style: Pair a steaming bowl of thick, supple kudai lamb noodles with the whole braised walleye or the classic kung pao chicken, peppered with crispy peanuts. On the weekend, come for a dim sum brunch.

A walleye in a red sauce in a white dish.
Szechuan-style walleye at Tea House.
Tea House Chinese Restaurant

Head to Pagoda for an all-you-can-eat dim sum spread of steaming shu mai, taro buns, pork congee, and turnip cakes, served Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Add on bottomless mimosas, sake, or sangria for an extra $15 a person. Pagoda has a full entree menu of roast duck, egg drop soup and the like, too.

Szechuan

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Szechuan, of course, specializes in Sichuan cuisine: glassy dumplings swimming in chili oil; beef with Sichuan bean curd and peppercorns; dry pot with squid and vegetables. But it also serves Cantonese and Mandarin dishes, plus some Chinese American appetizers like cream cheese wontons. The dan dan noodles are especially popular. Szechuan’s sister restaurant, Jun, helmed by chef Jessie Wong, is another great stop for fiery Sichuan fare.

Master Noodle (Saint Paul)

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Master Noodle (formerly Magic Noodle) makes fresh, hand-pulled noodle dishes daily in St. Paul’s Midway neighborhood. There are few better places for tender, springy dan dan noodles, hot sour noodle soup, and Mongolian beef fried noodles. Master Noodle also serves an excellent Taiwanese tomato beef brisket soup.

Wide rice noodles in a brown sauce and chili oil in a ceramic blue and grey bowl
Master Noodle in St. Paul.
Master Noodle

Peking Garden

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Peking Garden is a casual, family-oriented spot on St. Paul’s University Avenue, where it’s been serving Cantonese fare since 1991. Come for the excellent hospitality, the Dungeness crab in black bean sauce, and the sizzling beef brisket hot pot.

Grand Szechuan Restaurant

Chef Luo Guanghe’s dishes, shimmering with chili oil and studded with peppercorns, hit all the hot, sour, mouth-numbing notes of classic Sichuan cuisine. Try the beef and tofu in peppercorn broth, or the spicy lotus roots as an appetizer.

Mandarin Kitchen

Head to Mandarin Kitchen for a dim sum brunch of pan-fried turnip cakes, pillowy steamed chicken buns, egg custards, and steamed pork dumplings. (Mandarin Kitchen has a vast menu of entrees, too, and hot pot.) At peak meal times, small parties can expect share tables — an arrangement that only adds to the bustling, convivial atmosphere. On weekends, this spot is packed with families, and the line often wraps out the door.

A person using chopsticks to grab one of three pan-fried chive dumplings on a plate.
Pan-fried chive dumplings from Mandarin Kitchen.
Mandarin Kitchen

Rainbow Chinese Restaurant and Bar

Situated on Eat Street’s main drag, chef Tammy Wong’s Rainbow Chinese has been churning out excellent “Chinese Minnesotan” fare since the late 1980s — and after a pandemic hiatus, the dining room has finally reopened. Wander down Nicollet Avenue for plates of sauteed green beans and ma po tofu, simmered with Sichuan peppercorns.

Yangtze Restaurant

Though Yangtze has a full menu, it’s best-known for its weekend dim sum, served every Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Spare ribs arrive in a rich black bean sauce; golden-seared shrimp and chive dumplings are packed with sharp allium flavor. Round out the meal with sweet bites of egg custard pie.

Rice rolls in soy sauce on a white plate with a red patterned border.
Yangtze is one the metro’s best dim sum spots.
Yangtze Restaurant

Shuang Cheng

This 31-year Dinkytown staple is known for its top-notch Cantonese menu. It specializes in seafood dishes, like crab with ginger and scallions and baked lobster in a five-spice salt. (For holidays and celebrations, the Peking-style roast duck is a great choice.) Shuang Cheng has great hot pot, too.

Lao Sze Chuan

Also near the University of Minnesota campus, Lao Sze Chuan is a great place to share chilled, tangy Szechuan noodles; tea-smoked duck; and steaming beef soup, infused with spicy chili oil. Lao Sze Chuan’s appetizer list is notable, too — order some green bean jelly and spicy and sour squid for the table.

Hong Kong Noodle

A Dinkytown favorite for Cantonese cuisine, Hong Kong Noodle is a great stop for a bowl of warming barbecue pork noodle soup, a salt-and-pepper squid appetizer, or a dim sum brunch of steamed buns and dumplings.

Legendary Spice

Legendary Spice — formerly of the Lao Sze Chuan restaurant group, now linked to a Chengdu, China-based restaurant — focuses on classic Sichuan cuisine. The vast menu spans seafood, pork, beef, chicken, and vegetarian dishes, but the highlights are among the Sichuan cold appetizers (preserved duck egg with chili pepper, sliced beef and maw, etc.) and the Chengdu local favorites (spicy mao cai, tea-smoked duck, Sichuan crawfish, etc.).

A person adding scallions to a plate of dumplings topped with chili oil.
Legendary Spice in St. Paul.
Legendary Spice

Tea House Chinese Restaurant

After more than a decade on University Avenue, Tea House remains a staple for excellent Chinese fare — Szechuan in particular. It’s a great place to dine family-style: Pair a steaming bowl of thick, supple kudai lamb noodles with the whole braised walleye or the classic kung pao chicken, peppered with crispy peanuts. On the weekend, come for a dim sum brunch.

A walleye in a red sauce in a white dish.
Szechuan-style walleye at Tea House.
Tea House Chinese Restaurant

Pagoda

Head to Pagoda for an all-you-can-eat dim sum spread of steaming shu mai, taro buns, pork congee, and turnip cakes, served Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Add on bottomless mimosas, sake, or sangria for an extra $15 a person. Pagoda has a full entree menu of roast duck, egg drop soup and the like, too.

Szechuan

Szechuan, of course, specializes in Sichuan cuisine: glassy dumplings swimming in chili oil; beef with Sichuan bean curd and peppercorns; dry pot with squid and vegetables. But it also serves Cantonese and Mandarin dishes, plus some Chinese American appetizers like cream cheese wontons. The dan dan noodles are especially popular. Szechuan’s sister restaurant, Jun, helmed by chef Jessie Wong, is another great stop for fiery Sichuan fare.

Master Noodle (Saint Paul)

Master Noodle (formerly Magic Noodle) makes fresh, hand-pulled noodle dishes daily in St. Paul’s Midway neighborhood. There are few better places for tender, springy dan dan noodles, hot sour noodle soup, and Mongolian beef fried noodles. Master Noodle also serves an excellent Taiwanese tomato beef brisket soup.

Wide rice noodles in a brown sauce and chili oil in a ceramic blue and grey bowl
Master Noodle in St. Paul.
Master Noodle

Peking Garden

Peking Garden is a casual, family-oriented spot on St. Paul’s University Avenue, where it’s been serving Cantonese fare since 1991. Come for the excellent hospitality, the Dungeness crab in black bean sauce, and the sizzling beef brisket hot pot.

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