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Three pieces of nigiri on a blue and white-patterned plate.
Nigiri from Kado No Mise.
Wing Ta

12 Essential Twin Cities Sushi Restaurants

Sushi trains, delicate sashimi, and Japanese whiskey pours around the Cities

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Nigiri from Kado No Mise.
| Wing Ta

Elevated by relative newcomers Kado No Mise and Billy Sushi in Minneapolis’s North Loop, the Twin Cities’ sushi scene is proof that even landlocked cities can offer much in the realm of sashimi, maki, and uramaki. Sushi choices here are diverse: Grab petite nigiri plates off a sushi conveyor belt in downtown Minneapolis, pair a yellowtail roll with savory Tibetan momos, or try oshizushi, a type of sushi that’s pressed in horizontal layers like a cake. Here are some stellar sushi restaurants to sample around the Twin Cities.

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AMA Sushi

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Sister restaurant of Momo Sushi, Ama is one of the most exciting new restaurants to open in the Twin Cities in the past year. A Tibetan and Japanese fusion restaurant, its menu pairs savory beef and vegetarian momos with sushi and sashimi a la carte, plus chef’s specialty rolls. Try the Lungta roll, made with spicy salmon, tuna, yellowtail, avocado, and tobiko — its colors are an homage to Tibetan prayer flags. (Another unique favorite is the crazy monkey roll, made with fried banana and cream cheese.) Ama also sells a curated list of sakes at its Edina location on France Avenue.

Wakame Sushi & Asian Bistro

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This sushi restaurant near the western shore of Bde Maka Ska has an extensive menu of two-piece nigiri, from classics like yellowtail and Big Eye tuna to smelt roe, quail egg, and sea urchin. Rolls are offered at affordable price points, mostly in the $5 to $10 range; Wakame also hosts a happy hour every day from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. — enjoy sake, beer, and house wine on their patio for under $5. If you’re not settled on a sushi-only dinner, the menu features Thai noodle and rice dishes among other entrees.

Four pieces of sushi on a white plate topped with slices of avocado and black and red roe.
Sushi from Wakame.
Wake Sushi & Bistro

Origami Restaurant

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Origami is a Twin Cities sushi staple in the heart of Uptown, the winner of many reader’s choice awards in local magazines. It’s known for its comprehensive sake and Japanese whiskey list — try a pour of Hibiki Harmony or Tenjaku. For sushi, the restaurant has separate menus for sashimi and rolls: favorites are their hosomaki (thin rolls) and futomaki (fat rolls). Try the “black widow,” made with fried soft shell crab. Origami has a shaded patio that’s removed from the heavy traffic on Lagoon Avenue and Hennepin Avenue — an excellent respite for outdoor dining in the summer. (Or get takeout and walk to Bde Maka Ska’s 32nd avenue beach for a picnic.)

Six pieces of urumaki sushi on a white plate. The sushi has crab meat, salmon and avocado on top, and white rice on the outside.
An urumaki roll from Origami Restaurant.
Origami Restaurant

Kyatchi

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Kyatchi works to keep its menu sustainable: it partners with local suppliers like The Fish Guys, Larry Schulz Organic Farm, and Peterson Craft Meats. The restaurant serves sashimi, classic rolls, and platters, but is known for its oshizushi, or pressed sushi, made with layers of rice and fish like a cake. Try the battera oshizushi, with mackerel and clear kombu seaweed. Don’t skip the hot dogs, either — Kyatchi has won city magazine awards for both best sushi and best hot dogs.

Eight pieces of sushi on a white plate. The sushi is made with a light-colored fish and avocado, and the rice is on the outside of the seaweed.
A simple sushi roll from Kyatchi.
Kyatchi

Sushi Train

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Sushi Train is the first conveyor belt sushi restaurant to have opened in the Twin Cities, bringing the Osaka invention to Nicollet Mall in Minneapolis. The restaurant is designed to resemble a subway station, with tiling and understated decor — the conveyor belt winds its way through two rows of booths. Sushi Train is a great option for sampling a variety of sushi pieces: Plates are color-coded and marked with prices ranging from $1.95 to $5.50. The full menu also offers classic rolls and other dishes like poke.

Billy Sushi ビリー寿司

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Billy Sushi, a relative newcomer to the Twin Cities’ sushi scene, has a magnetic, larger-than-life presence in Minneapolis’s North Loop. Grab a seat at the long sushi bar (which is busy most evenings, fair warning) or make a reservation for a table in the 130-seat dining area. The restaurant runs a bit pricier than most spots on this list — specialty maki rolls land in the $19 to $35 range, and two pieces of nigiri run $6 to $18 — but it’s known for creative rolls made with fatty cuts of fish, generous hunks of sashimi, and flourishes like walu and unagi topped with a 24-karat gold sheet.

A sushi roll on a black plate topped with pink fish and sheets of gold.
The Butterfly Kiss roll from Billy Sushi.
Billy Sushi

Kado no Mise

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Kado No Mise is one-fourth of an elegant Japanese dining experience at its North First Avenue location: Its sister components are Kaiseki Furukawa, which highlights Japanese cooking rooted in 16th-century tea ceremony traditions; Gori Gori Peku, a Japanese whiskey bar; and Sanjusan, which offers Japanese-Italian cuisine and serves intriguing cocktails. Kado No Mise, which translates to “corner restaurant,” serves Edomae sushi and simple Japanese dishes on three tasting menus of varying prices, from $60 to $145. The matsu menu features a 13-piece sushi plate.

Masu Sushi & Robata

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Masu Sushi and Robata has three locations: Northeast Minneapolis, Mall of America, and Apple Valley. The restaurant was conceived in part by the owner of Sushi Avenue, a national purveyor of fresh fish — it sources its fish with an eye toward sustainability, following recommendations from the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. Masu’s sushi menu is somewhat slimmer than other Twin Cities offerings, but its cocktail menu is extensive and grouped by pairings: light drinks for nigiri and sashimi, fruity for rolls and appetizers, and earthy for meat and noodle dishes.

Midori's Floating World Cafe

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Midori’s Floating World Cafe was extensively damaged during the social uprisings of 2020, but has since opened a new spot just a few blocks west on Lake Street. The sushi menu is simple — spicy salmon and vegan caterpillar rolls, hamachi and unagi nigiri — and accompanied by other Japanese dishes like kitsune udon, shoyu ramen, and soba salad. Save room for sweet, doughy daifuku: sweet red bean filling encased in a mochi shell. For now, Midori’s is takeout only.

Sakana Sushi & Asian Bistro

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Sakana is a great spot if you’re in the market for a sushi boat, and the rolls are quite big. Try the black dragon roll — a classic take amped up with the addition of lobster — the sushi bullet roll, made with white tuna, mango, and salmon, or the Captain Crunch tempura roll.

Yumi Japanese Restaurant & Bar - Saint Paul

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Yumi is one of St. Paul’s best bets for sushi. Start with some fresh, delicate sashimi, like the fatty tuna or raw scallop. Yumi has all the classic specialty rolls, plus signature rolls with more unexpected combinations. The lollipop, for example, is wrapped with a chef’s choice of six types of fish, and the 2-14* roll features a dynamite mix wrapped in pink soy paper.

Sakura Restaurant & Bar

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Sakura has been a part of the Twin Cities’ sushi scene for more than 30 years. Its sashimi menu is extensive — try the fatty salmon, surf clam, or wasabi flying fish egg — and its rolls cover all the classics (tempura, caterpillar rolls, unagi, and spicy crab) and also deviate beyond them, featuring ingredients like chicken tempura, mango sauce, and spicy lobster. Sakura is known for its sushi boats, too. The downtown location makes it the perfect spot for dinner before a show at the Ordway Center for Performing Arts.

AMA Sushi

Sister restaurant of Momo Sushi, Ama is one of the most exciting new restaurants to open in the Twin Cities in the past year. A Tibetan and Japanese fusion restaurant, its menu pairs savory beef and vegetarian momos with sushi and sashimi a la carte, plus chef’s specialty rolls. Try the Lungta roll, made with spicy salmon, tuna, yellowtail, avocado, and tobiko — its colors are an homage to Tibetan prayer flags. (Another unique favorite is the crazy monkey roll, made with fried banana and cream cheese.) Ama also sells a curated list of sakes at its Edina location on France Avenue.

Wakame Sushi & Asian Bistro

This sushi restaurant near the western shore of Bde Maka Ska has an extensive menu of two-piece nigiri, from classics like yellowtail and Big Eye tuna to smelt roe, quail egg, and sea urchin. Rolls are offered at affordable price points, mostly in the $5 to $10 range; Wakame also hosts a happy hour every day from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. — enjoy sake, beer, and house wine on their patio for under $5. If you’re not settled on a sushi-only dinner, the menu features Thai noodle and rice dishes among other entrees.

Four pieces of sushi on a white plate topped with slices of avocado and black and red roe.
Sushi from Wakame.
Wake Sushi & Bistro

Origami Restaurant

Origami is a Twin Cities sushi staple in the heart of Uptown, the winner of many reader’s choice awards in local magazines. It’s known for its comprehensive sake and Japanese whiskey list — try a pour of Hibiki Harmony or Tenjaku. For sushi, the restaurant has separate menus for sashimi and rolls: favorites are their hosomaki (thin rolls) and futomaki (fat rolls). Try the “black widow,” made with fried soft shell crab. Origami has a shaded patio that’s removed from the heavy traffic on Lagoon Avenue and Hennepin Avenue — an excellent respite for outdoor dining in the summer. (Or get takeout and walk to Bde Maka Ska’s 32nd avenue beach for a picnic.)

Six pieces of urumaki sushi on a white plate. The sushi has crab meat, salmon and avocado on top, and white rice on the outside.
An urumaki roll from Origami Restaurant.
Origami Restaurant

Kyatchi

Kyatchi works to keep its menu sustainable: it partners with local suppliers like The Fish Guys, Larry Schulz Organic Farm, and Peterson Craft Meats. The restaurant serves sashimi, classic rolls, and platters, but is known for its oshizushi, or pressed sushi, made with layers of rice and fish like a cake. Try the battera oshizushi, with mackerel and clear kombu seaweed. Don’t skip the hot dogs, either — Kyatchi has won city magazine awards for both best sushi and best hot dogs.

Eight pieces of sushi on a white plate. The sushi is made with a light-colored fish and avocado, and the rice is on the outside of the seaweed.
A simple sushi roll from Kyatchi.
Kyatchi

Sushi Train

Sushi Train is the first conveyor belt sushi restaurant to have opened in the Twin Cities, bringing the Osaka invention to Nicollet Mall in Minneapolis. The restaurant is designed to resemble a subway station, with tiling and understated decor — the conveyor belt winds its way through two rows of booths. Sushi Train is a great option for sampling a variety of sushi pieces: Plates are color-coded and marked with prices ranging from $1.95 to $5.50. The full menu also offers classic rolls and other dishes like poke.

Billy Sushi ビリー寿司

Billy Sushi, a relative newcomer to the Twin Cities’ sushi scene, has a magnetic, larger-than-life presence in Minneapolis’s North Loop. Grab a seat at the long sushi bar (which is busy most evenings, fair warning) or make a reservation for a table in the 130-seat dining area. The restaurant runs a bit pricier than most spots on this list — specialty maki rolls land in the $19 to $35 range, and two pieces of nigiri run $6 to $18 — but it’s known for creative rolls made with fatty cuts of fish, generous hunks of sashimi, and flourishes like walu and unagi topped with a 24-karat gold sheet.

A sushi roll on a black plate topped with pink fish and sheets of gold.
The Butterfly Kiss roll from Billy Sushi.
Billy Sushi

Kado no Mise

Kado No Mise is one-fourth of an elegant Japanese dining experience at its North First Avenue location: Its sister components are Kaiseki Furukawa, which highlights Japanese cooking rooted in 16th-century tea ceremony traditions; Gori Gori Peku, a Japanese whiskey bar; and Sanjusan, which offers Japanese-Italian cuisine and serves intriguing cocktails. Kado No Mise, which translates to “corner restaurant,” serves Edomae sushi and simple Japanese dishes on three tasting menus of varying prices, from $60 to $145. The matsu menu features a 13-piece sushi plate.

Masu Sushi & Robata

Masu Sushi and Robata has three locations: Northeast Minneapolis, Mall of America, and Apple Valley. The restaurant was conceived in part by the owner of Sushi Avenue, a national purveyor of fresh fish — it sources its fish with an eye toward sustainability, following recommendations from the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. Masu’s sushi menu is somewhat slimmer than other Twin Cities offerings, but its cocktail menu is extensive and grouped by pairings: light drinks for nigiri and sashimi, fruity for rolls and appetizers, and earthy for meat and noodle dishes.

Midori's Floating World Cafe

Midori’s Floating World Cafe was extensively damaged during the social uprisings of 2020, but has since opened a new spot just a few blocks west on Lake Street. The sushi menu is simple — spicy salmon and vegan caterpillar rolls, hamachi and unagi nigiri — and accompanied by other Japanese dishes like kitsune udon, shoyu ramen, and soba salad. Save room for sweet, doughy daifuku: sweet red bean filling encased in a mochi shell. For now, Midori’s is takeout only.

Sakana Sushi & Asian Bistro

Sakana is a great spot if you’re in the market for a sushi boat, and the rolls are quite big. Try the black dragon roll — a classic take amped up with the addition of lobster — the sushi bullet roll, made with white tuna, mango, and salmon, or the Captain Crunch tempura roll.

Yumi Japanese Restaurant & Bar - Saint Paul

Yumi is one of St. Paul’s best bets for sushi. Start with some fresh, delicate sashimi, like the fatty tuna or raw scallop. Yumi has all the classic specialty rolls, plus signature rolls with more unexpected combinations. The lollipop, for example, is wrapped with a chef’s choice of six types of fish, and the 2-14* roll features a dynamite mix wrapped in pink soy paper.

Sakura Restaurant & Bar

Sakura has been a part of the Twin Cities’ sushi scene for more than 30 years. Its sashimi menu is extensive — try the fatty salmon, surf clam, or wasabi flying fish egg — and its rolls cover all the classics (tempura, caterpillar rolls, unagi, and spicy crab) and also deviate beyond them, featuring ingredients like chicken tempura, mango sauce, and spicy lobster. Sakura is known for its sushi boats, too. The downtown location makes it the perfect spot for dinner before a show at the Ordway Center for Performing Arts.

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