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The Hottest Food Trucks in Minneapolis

Which curbs you'll want to haunt for the best new mobile eateries.

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It’s spring in Minneapolis-St. Paul, meaning millions of area fingers are crossed for a snow- and ice-free patio season opener. Plenty of food truck operators are watching the weather with trepidation, too, hoping for the hordes of hungry eaters that clear skies invariably bring.

Though we can’t predict the weather, we can say with confidence that these new or nearly new trucks are poised to shine on any given day, absent frozen precipitation and/or howling winds. Behold: Spring 2015’s seven hottest food trucks (so far).

Follow the trucks on Twitter to find the most up-to-date information on the location, because finding the trucks is half the fun.

-By Brian Martucci

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Green + the Grain

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Roughage is a foreign concept for many Twin Cities food trucks. (Not that butter is a bad stand-in.) Green + the Grain proudly breaks the greasy mold, though. The truck has earned between-mouthfuls praise for its inimitable Cowboy Salad (a south-of-the-border affair that features romaine lettuce, beef tenderloin, black bean pico de gallo and shaved sweet corn, among other tasty ingredients) and Berry Natural Salad (fresh fruit, local bleu cheese, spinach, chicken, toasted walnut, wheatberry, white onion and dried cranberries). Also a must-try: house-made, and unmistakably tangy, frozen yogurt. [Photo courtesy Green + the Grain Facebook page]

Sal's Place on the Road

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Sal’s Place on the Road serves up honest Italian food with a (very) gentle twist: baked and fresh ziti, caprese sandwiches and sausage and peppers. The most distinctive menu item are the arancini, a fried Sicilian rice ball. Don’t miss the chocolate ravioli. [Photo courtesy Sal's Place on the Road Facebook]

The Curious Goat

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The Curious Goat specializes in, well, goat. Chef Ian Gray (of the now-shuttered Gray House) rotates braised goat sliders, maple goat sliders with goat bacon, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts, and goat cheese curds through a slightly pricier-than-average menu that rewards big spenders with truly outstanding flavors.

TruPizza

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Tru Pizza bills itself as “the only Minneapolis-based wood fired pizza truck." Its local pride shows in Minnesota-sourced ingredients on hearty, flash-baked pizza pies; locally milled flour, local sausage from southwestern Minnesota’s Pastures of Plenty Farm, local cured meats from Northeast Minneapolis’s Red Table Meats, and beef from Moonstone Farm (also in southwestern Minnesota). Fun fact: Tru Pizza’s 800-plus-degree oven cooks pies in 90 seconds flat — without scalding any customers. [Photo courtesy Tru Pizza Facebook page]

Butcher Salt

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The menu features a quirky mix of breakfast favorites like the hash browns with pepper jack, rosemary and sauteed onions, peppers and tomatoes and lunch standbys. The Ranger: chicken or roast beef with bacon, chipotle cheese sauce and sauteed peppers and onions. Just about everything gets a liberal seasoning of sea salt infused with rosemary, sage, thyme and marjoram,” — i.e., butcher salt. [Photo courtesy Butcher Salt Facebook Page]

Tatanka Truck

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Tatanka Truck is the Twin Cities’ — and possibly the country’s — first food truck devoted exclusively to pre-contact Native American fare. That means no beef, pork or chicken, according to brand manager Dana Thompson. Also forbidden: dairy, wheat and refined sugars. The brainchild of Sean Sherman, owner of Seward’s wildly successful Sioux Chef restaurant. Look for multiple takes on bison, and possibly other native game species, with native plants to bulk up the plates.

Green + the Grain

Roughage is a foreign concept for many Twin Cities food trucks. (Not that butter is a bad stand-in.) Green + the Grain proudly breaks the greasy mold, though. The truck has earned between-mouthfuls praise for its inimitable Cowboy Salad (a south-of-the-border affair that features romaine lettuce, beef tenderloin, black bean pico de gallo and shaved sweet corn, among other tasty ingredients) and Berry Natural Salad (fresh fruit, local bleu cheese, spinach, chicken, toasted walnut, wheatberry, white onion and dried cranberries). Also a must-try: house-made, and unmistakably tangy, frozen yogurt. [Photo courtesy Green + the Grain Facebook page]

Sal's Place on the Road

Sal’s Place on the Road serves up honest Italian food with a (very) gentle twist: baked and fresh ziti, caprese sandwiches and sausage and peppers. The most distinctive menu item are the arancini, a fried Sicilian rice ball. Don’t miss the chocolate ravioli. [Photo courtesy Sal's Place on the Road Facebook]

The Curious Goat

The Curious Goat specializes in, well, goat. Chef Ian Gray (of the now-shuttered Gray House) rotates braised goat sliders, maple goat sliders with goat bacon, goat cheese and Brussels sprouts, and goat cheese curds through a slightly pricier-than-average menu that rewards big spenders with truly outstanding flavors.

TruPizza

Tru Pizza bills itself as “the only Minneapolis-based wood fired pizza truck." Its local pride shows in Minnesota-sourced ingredients on hearty, flash-baked pizza pies; locally milled flour, local sausage from southwestern Minnesota’s Pastures of Plenty Farm, local cured meats from Northeast Minneapolis’s Red Table Meats, and beef from Moonstone Farm (also in southwestern Minnesota). Fun fact: Tru Pizza’s 800-plus-degree oven cooks pies in 90 seconds flat — without scalding any customers. [Photo courtesy Tru Pizza Facebook page]

Butcher Salt

The menu features a quirky mix of breakfast favorites like the hash browns with pepper jack, rosemary and sauteed onions, peppers and tomatoes and lunch standbys. The Ranger: chicken or roast beef with bacon, chipotle cheese sauce and sauteed peppers and onions. Just about everything gets a liberal seasoning of sea salt infused with rosemary, sage, thyme and marjoram,” — i.e., butcher salt. [Photo courtesy Butcher Salt Facebook Page]

Tatanka Truck

Tatanka Truck is the Twin Cities’ — and possibly the country’s — first food truck devoted exclusively to pre-contact Native American fare. That means no beef, pork or chicken, according to brand manager Dana Thompson. Also forbidden: dairy, wheat and refined sugars. The brainchild of Sean Sherman, owner of Seward’s wildly successful Sioux Chef restaurant. Look for multiple takes on bison, and possibly other native game species, with native plants to bulk up the plates.

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